Category «Rhomaleosauridae»

Rhomaleosauridae

All rhomaleosaurids have a relatively large head with a reasonably long neck composed of about 28 vertebrae. The group has a stratigraphical range from the Lower Jurassic to the Middle Jurassic. Rhomaleosaurid phylogeny Cladogram of rhomaleosaurid pliosaurs (from Smith and Dyke, 2008) Rhomaleosaurid genera Archaeonectrus (according to Smith and Dyke, [2008]) Borealonectes Eurycleidus Leptocleidus (according …

Maresaurus

M. coccai (Gasparini, 1997) type material: MOZ 4386 V articulated skull and mandible, atlas-axis and first cervical vertebrae. From the upper part of the Los Molles Formation, Cuyo Group, Emileia giebeli and Emileia multiformis subzone.

Rhomaleosaurus

Rhomaleosaurus is the largest known Lower Jurassic pliosaur and was the top predator in early Jurassic marine ecosystems. It has a reinforced skull to help resist torsion and a ferocious set of teeth, a combination of characters perfect for snatching and killing cephalopods, fish, and other marine reptiles. Historically, the genus Rhomaleosaurus has been interchangeable …

Meyerasaurus

M. victor was originally described and figured by Fraas (1910). Historically, M. victor has been regarded as a species of Rhomaleosaurus and is often associated in the literature under the defunct name ‘Thaumatosaurus’. Smith and Vincent (2010) identified M. victor as generically distinct from Rhomaleosaurus and erected the new name Meyerasaurus for it (Smith and Dyke, 2008). The …

Atychodracon

The genus Atychodracon was erected by Smith (2015) to accommodate ‘Rhomaleosaurus’ megacephalus, which deserved generic separation from Rhomaleosaurus sensu stricto (Smith and Dyke, 2008). A. megacephalus is closely related to Eurycleidus and some authors have regarded A. megacephalus as a distinct species of Eurycleidus. The original holotype specimen of A. megacephalus was housed in the …

Archaeonectrus

The genus Archaeonectrus was proposed by Novozhilov (1964) for ‘Plesiosaurus’ rostratus, a species named by Owen (1865). By modern standards, Owen’s (1865) original description is rather inadequate. One notable characteristic of Archaeonectrus rostratus is the relatively small size of the limbs relative to its body. It has been classified as a pliosauroid, sometimes within the …