the plesiosaur directory main logo



Plesiosaur Bites

Book review: Kronos Rising: Kraken (vol. 1), by Max Hawthorne

with 2 comments

“[His] mind began to shut down in an effort to preserve his sanity” – Garm Braddock in Kronos Rising: Kraken (vol. 1)

Hawthorne’s mahoosive Kronosaurus imperator is back and this time she’s brought her buddies along for the ride. This sequel to Kronos Rising (which I reviewed here) is set decades after the events of the first book, in a world where pliosaurs now run amok. Oceanic ecosystems are in turmoil and it’s time to get military on these bastard reptiles! Beefcake brothers Garm and Dirk are at the heart of proceedings as they take steps to emerge victorious from the raging ‘Saurian War’. Little do they know the titular Kraken is waiting to arrive on the scene to cause even more havoc…

Kronos Rising: Kraken (vol. 1.) cover

I won’t comment in detail on the story, style, tone, characters, and so on. I have opinions, of course, but who am I, as a lowly palaeontologist, to judge? All I’ll say is that it wasn’t to my taste. What I can focus on, as I did in my previous review, is the science. The aspects of the book that only a pedant like me will get his undies in a bind over. So, that’s what I’ll do – it’s panty twisting time.

One of my criticisms of the original novel was the dubious status of the species Kronosaurus imperator. This is the sort of nit-pick that only the most hard-nosed academic would rest any importance on, but I noticed the issue is still not resolved in Kronos Rising: Kraken. It means the species is technically invalid – a nomen nudum. This strikes me as somewhat appropriate given Hawthorne’s proclivity for exposing his characters’ most intimate fleshy parts.

Generally the anatomical descriptions are very good (n.b. I’m talking about the reptiles now!) and Hawthorne has done research to ensure the scientist characters use the correct language and terminology. However, he’s also not afraid to take liberties. For example, in the book, pliosaurs lay spherical eggs in nests, whereas we know sauropterygians gave birth to live young. The pliosaur’s teeth are described as sharply ridged with razor-sharp ends, whereas the course ridges on pliosaur teeth aren’t sharp, and pliosaur teeth really taper to a blunt bone-crushing apex. The fictional monsters skin consists of a “thick hide covered with rock hard scales”, yet it “absorbs 30% of the oxygen they need from the water”. In reality, there would have to be a compromise – skin has to be thin to absorb oxygen. In my Kronos Rising review I compiled a long list of the pliosaur’s superpowers. We can now also add camouflage onto said list. Don’t get me wrong, these are not complaints per se, I’m just saying. The key word to remember here – fiction. Let it go, let it go!

As with the previous novel, there’s a worrying infatuation with large size, be it the size of the creatures, the vessels, the machinery, the architecture, Dirk’s penis, Garm’s penis. “What can I say? Size matters!” chuckles one of the characters in the book. If you, too, believe size matters, then this is the book for you!

While Kronos Rising: Kraken (vol. 1) didn’t float my boat, aficionados of maritime monster fiction should probably pick up a copy and judge for themselves. Can thousands of Hawthorne’s fanatic ‘Legions of Kronos’ be wrong? Kronos Rising: Kraken (vol. 1), is available from Amazon.com here and Amazon.co.uk here. The official Kronos Rising website is located at http://www.kronosrising.com and you can also visit and like the Kronos Rising Facebook Page here, where Hawthorne makes a special effort to engage with readers, and sometimes puts forward his own interesting pet paleontological hypotheses. Lastly, thanks go to Max for the review copy – I hope you don’t regret the kind gesture!

A quick additional note. The original Kronos Rising novel now has a swanky new front cover, featuring amazing artwork. Check it out!

Kronos Rising new cover

with 2 comments

Written by Adam S. Smith

July 14th, 2016 at 1:24 pm

2 Responses to 'Book review: Kronos Rising: Kraken (vol. 1), by Max Hawthorne'

Subscribe to comments with RSS or TrackBack to 'Book review: Kronos Rising: Kraken (vol. 1), by Max Hawthorne'.

  1. The guy got quite a bad reputation among paleo-nerds for his pseudoscience..

    Matt

    21 Jul 16 at 2:38 pm

  2. I’ve seen the author uses the reported tooth marks in the large Mexican pliosaur as evidence for pliosaurs in excess of 20 m long…

    What is the scientific relevance to that ? Are tooth marks a good indicator to accredit supersize up to twice larger than the largest, yet fragmentary, pliosaurs on record ?
    Aren’t all the big, hyped specimens like the Svalbard pliosaurs, the Stretham, the Dorset, the Harvard Kronosaurus…already indicative of rather aged individuals ? So possibly on the large-sized side of their species ?

    And would a pliosaur actually need to reach 20 m or more ? What about environmental and physiological constraints for a macrophagous animal to reach larger sizes ?

    Jaime

    11 Jun 17 at 10:34 pm

Leave a Reply